How to Manage Student Loans and Get Rid of Credit Card Debt for Good

So you want to manage your student loans and perhaps even get rid of credit card debt for good, right? Learning to structure and organize your finances before you start to earn your degree never comes easy for anyone, and is often not taught by the people in our lives. More times than not our parents are too busy with their own lives and might feel they will stress you out more by playing with the numbers of budgeting to show you just what you are up against in advance. So once you have graduated you should already have a general idea by doing some basic inventory of your finances and perhaps check out what you may foresee for the coming 6-12 months in college.

We are hearing in the news that university education is about to get much more expensive, means that it is more important than ever before that students and graduates get their finances straight and are more proactive when it comes to money matters. Managing your finances as such an exciting, and expensive, time can be difficult, so we’ve put together some useful tips to help you on how you get in less debt and have a better chance of getting out of it once you finish in education.

Everyone should be keeping a close watch on overdrawn accounts at the lowest possible interest, make sure you know how much is in each account and make a record of any old direct debits or payments. To make some positive changes for the future of our finances we need to take a hard look at ourselves to see if we were careless with old statements and bank letters, usually in a big mixed up box where there is no chance of ever finding the document you’re after. Try to get out of the habit of doing this and use a filing cabinet or organizer to sort any documents by account, meaning it’s easier to find something should you need to check an overdraft limit, account number or any other information provided by the bank. Every 6 months go through your documents and get rid of anything you no longer require.

So we should always work at budgeting our monthly income and then subtract the cost of your monthly essentials from it. Begin with your rent, utility bills and food. This will leave you with your disposable income, which you should then divide into weekly amounts and at the beginning of each week take out in cash. Having the cash in your wallet rather than using your card means you always know how much is left for the week, making you less likely to overspend.

When debt worries creep up on you, it can be tempting to ignore them and carry on with the more enjoyable things in life- like the student union bar- but it’s really important that you remain aware of your finances and avoid diversion tactics such as writing out checks for amounts you know you don’t have or taking money out when you know a debit is about to put you up to your limit, as you will just end up in more debt because of charges.

Work at your studying, and work at learning to save your money and only borrow for the purpose of increasing your credit score, not to end up with high and out of control bills. There are plenty of part time jobs going, but make sure you use your time wisely and work more in Holidays and quiet times of the year. Working less during exams and deadlines to stay focused on your achievements.

SBA Loans and the New Small Business Bill

Near the end of September 2010, President Barack Obama signed a Small Business Bill into effect. The new bill set aside $30 billion for small business lending. The law also includes $12 billion in tax breaks for small companies. This bill was signed into effect as a response to the 9.6 unemployment dissent in America. President Obama and the administration signed the bill to demonstrate an effort to decrease the unemployment levels in the United States. President Obama hopes that the loan will create as many as 500,000 new jobs within the next couple of years.

Small Business Jobs Act 2010 Changes

The Small Business Jobs Act includes the Recovery Act Loans Extension that provides $14 billion in lending support. Small Business Administration (SBA) Recovery loans will be extended under the law with a 90% guarantee and reduced fees. At the time that the bill was signed, 1,400 small businesses were waiting for funding. Since the signing of the Recovery Act, 70,000 Recovery loans have been supported. Over $680 million dollars have created $30 billion in lending support.

The bill supports higher loan limits, and the maximum loan sizes increased in the pre-established loan programs. The new bill also increases the 7(a) and 504 loan limits from $2 million to $5 million. Manufacturers may receive up to $5.5 million. The 7(a) loan program is one of the most flexible loan programs offered for start ups and existing small businesses. Most of these loans are gained through commercial lending institutions. The 7(a) loan program includes an Export Loan program and a Rural Lender Advantage program. Some businesses will be able to refinance and incorporate their commercial real estate mortgages into the 504 loan program. However, this only applies to owner occupied units.

Microloan limits increased from $35,000 to $50,000. These loans are designed to help entrepreneurs with large start-up companies and small businesses owners in underserved communities. The new bill also increases small business eligibility for SBA loans. They make this possible by increasing the “alternate size standard” to small businesses with less than $15 million in net worth. This also applies to those businesses with less than $5 million in average net income. The law also increases the amount of Small Business Administration (SBA) Express loans from $350,000 to $1 million. Working Capital and Commercial Real Estate Refinancing received temporary enhancements to assist small business owners.

Marriage And Financing – 3 Reasons Why New Couples Fight and Solutions to Solve Them

Marriage And Financing: 3 Reasons Why New Couples Fight Over Finances

It is common for new couples to fight over money. In fact, research has proved that one of the most common sources of misunderstanding among couples roots from financial problems. There is no such thing as easy money. Individuals work hard to earn enough for their daily expenses, to pay out bills and to survive day to day living. Before tying the knot, it is important that couples understand some of the reasons why partners may come to fight over finance and more importantly why budgeting needs to become an essential part of the relationship.

Spending too much. In every couple, one will always spend more than the other. Stereotypically it’s the women. However, there are also men who love to splurge on cars, tools, sports and so on. The difference is, one wants to spend this much and the other doesn’t. Now ofcourse neither want to compromise their wants or needs. This can quickly cause an argument. So before settling down, couples should be ready to make major adjustments with their spending. Both need to realise that in marriage compromise is a must, especially when there are more important bills to pay like the mortgage, car, health insurance and possibly even baby preparations.

Credit Card Bills. Credit card bills can sometimes seem like the end of the world in a relationship. Avoid them all together and use cash instead. Fights are generally a given when a credit card bill arrives. That whopping figure – the night when the husband took his friends out for rounds of drinks, the new kitchen appliances she bought, the new suit, a collector’s toy, etc. They all add up and it can be very hard to work out who purchased what and when at the end of every month. New couples tend to think that just because they are married, the better half will tolerate the shopping splurges and shouted rounds of drinks at the bar. But this is not the case and more often than not, they end up fighting. So avoid the fight all together and pay in cash instead that way you will avoid the monthly credit card bill you both dread.

Envy. Money and Envy tend to go hand in hand and when your married this situation can be even more intense. Some couples get jealous when they find out that their neighbour has just bought a luxury car. They feel that they need to have one or else, their marriage won’t be as good as the neighbours. So they order one out of impulse. The results are destructive. Shopping for luxury items on an impulse can result to financial turmoil. This ruins a couple’s chance to enjoy a wonderful future. They end up paying for something that they do not really need. Throwing away money they could have used the to save up for their kids’ education or a magnificent holiday getaway to rekindle the love.

Conjugal debt. Some couples fail to discuss individual debts before getting married. These could be study loans, car loans, etc. When the issues arise, whether it be early or later in the relationship expect a major argument among couples. This stems solely from a lack of communication. So it is essential that couples, even before they are married, learn that open communication amongst each other is the sole key to a happy long lasting marriage.